The last feudal state
Després de la publicitat pots interactuar amb el player amb els següents botons Engegar/Aturar Silenciar Pujar el volum Disminuir el volum Instruccions per interactuar amb el player
imatge
Pots utilitzar chromecast a l'APP de TV3
30 Minuts

The last feudal state

The Isle of Sark is in the English Channel. With 600 inhabitants and an area of two square miles, democratic forms of government have not been the law of the land here until now. The island belongs to a feudal lord, the Seigneur, John Michael Beaumont, granted to him by the English Crown. Until a short time ago, Beaumont still held anachronistic rights such as the right to a thirteenth part of all land transactions or being the only person allowed to own doves and pigeons on Sark.

The Isle of Sark is in the English Channel. With 600 inhabitants and an area of two square miles, democratic forms of government have not been the law of the land here until now.
The island belongs to a feudal lord, the Seigneur, John Michael Beaumont, granted to him by the English Crown. Until a short time ago, Beaumont still held anachronistic rights such as the right to a thirteenth part of all land transactions or being the only person allowed to own doves and pigeons on Sark.
In 1993, the 74-year-old multimillionaire twins, Sirs David and Frederick Barclay--owners of the Ritz in London, the Daily Telegraph and a successful line of home shopping catalogues selling via the Internet--bought a neighboring island where they built their own castle. Their disagreement with Sark legislation, especially the law requiring them to pay the Seigneur a thirteenth part of the price paid for the island, led them to court where they claimed the Beaumont regime was not complying with the European Convention of Human Rights. Meanwhile, the Barclay brothers have bought up most of Sark's hotels and now own 25% of the land on the island. They employ about 150 of the island's inhabitants.
All of this has led to the first democratic elections in Sark in over 450 years. For the island's conservative society, reluctant to accept sudden change, the Barclay operation is a far cry from democracy and is viewed as a negative example of savage capitalism.
The elections are, therefore, vital in determining the future of an island that in the 21st century refuses to allow public street lighting, cars, paved roads, and where the only access is by sea. A traditional society versus twin multimillionaires who have the might of a battery of lawyers and their experience as media moguls. It is the story of a 15th-century David against a 21st-century Goliath.