Iran's "Generation K"
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30 Minuts

Iran's "Generation K"

TV3's "30 minuts" looks at the situation in Iran just two days before the country's presidential elections. Khomeini and Khamenei were the two spiritual leaders that founded the Islamic Republic of Iran almost exactly three decades ago. But many of the country's youth – Iran's so-called "Generation K" do not remember the revolution. For some of them the revolution is steeped in glorious legend. For others, it is something to be consigned to the dustbin of history. The elections on the 12th of July will show whether the Revolution still holds sway or is on its last legs.

TV3's "30 minuts" looks at the situation in Iran just two days before the country's presidential elections. Khomeini and Khamenei were the two spiritual leaders that founded the Islamic Republic of Iran almost exactly three decades ago. But many of the country's youth – Iran's so-called "Generation K" do not remember the revolution. For some of them the revolution is steeped in glorious legend. For others, it is something to be consigned to the dustbin of history. The elections on the 12th of July will show whether the Revolution still holds sway or is on its last legs.
Iranian society and particularly young people in the big cities are far more liberal than the regime that governs them. The regime is a potentially explosive mixture of reformers and conservatives, theocrats and democrats, elected politicians and self-elected clergy. Some voters laud Law and Order and Iran's new-found national pride. Others want change.
The elections are trumpeted as free and fair but all the candidates have to be approved by the regime. It is a democracy of sorts but it contains fatal flaws. The "30 minuts" programme team looks at the new society emerging in Iran and its growing disenchantment with the country's theocratic regime. Many in "Generation K" want to end the simmering dispute with the international community over Iran's nuclear ambitions and to build a modern, democratic society but they face formidable obstacles.